AN INCENTIVE LEARNING APPROACH TO DECISION MAKING

Authors
  1. Cutmore, T.R.H.
  2. Beninger, R.J.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN);Queen's Univ, Kingston ONT (CAN)
Abstract
Incentive learning (IL) theory describes a process whereby an organism learns to orient towards, approach and manipulate certain stimulus objects in the environment. More generally, IL is a process which leads to a decision making capability. The history of development of this theory has its origins in the work of behaviourists such as Hull and Spence in the middle part of this century. More recently, IL theory has been considerably refined by advances in the neurosciences with the study of the biochemical basis of learning. In particular, the neurotransmitter dopamine has been implicated as an important mediator of IL in the brain. The importance of dopamine and IL in human behaviour is indicated by the significant impairments evident in schizophrenia and the effects of neuroleptic drugs. A neuronal model is presented which summarizes these recent developments. TRUNCATED
Report Number
DCIEM-91-13 — Research Report (Interim)
Date of publication
15 Jan 1991
Number of Pages
19
DSTKIM No
91-01600
CANDIS No
68805
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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