A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF CHANGING AMBIENT TEMPERATURE ON PHYSIOLOGICAL AND COMFORT PARAMETERS WHILE SLEEPING IN A STANDARD SLEEPING BAG

Authors
  1. Scott, H.A.
  2. Conger, P.
  3. Mattern, K.
  4. Meyer, G.
Corporate Authors
Defence Research Establishment Ottawa, Ottawa ONT (CAN);Alberta Univ, Edmonton ALTA (CAN) Dept of Physical Education and Sports Studies
Abstract
Six relatively fit experienced outdoorsmen slept overnight at four cold ambient temperatures (predicted thermoneutral, thermoneutral pluse 5C, thermoneutral minus 5C and thermoneutral minus 10C) in a sleeping bag of known standardized insulation to determine effects on sleep quantity and thermal comfort, core and peripheral temperatures, heat production and heat content. Body height and weight, and age was used to predict resing metabolic rate. Burton and Edholm's assumption that 80% of RMR was directed to heat production was used in predicting ambient thermoneutral temperature. This assumption produced an ambient temperature systematically lower than the subjects required for thermal comfort (mean skin temperature of 32C). However, when Shapiro's assumption that only 66% of RMR is directed to heating in deep sleep was used in predicting thermoneutrals it was found that all subjects would have received a thermally comfortable sleep. TRUNCATED
Report Number
DREO/PSD/EPS-03/90 — Contractor Report (Final)
Date of publication
15 Jun 1990
Number of Pages
200
DSTKIM No
91-04195
CANDIS No
71383
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

Permanent link

Document 1 of 1

Date modified: