LATULIPPE: A CASE STUDY OF A ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY KILOMETER RUN

Authors
  1. O'Hara, W.J.
  2. Allen, C.
  3. Shephard, R.J.
  4. and others
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
The occasion of a 160 km run by Philip LaTulippe at CFB Toronto during May 24-25, 1974, provided an opportunity for DCIEM scientists to document the physiological changes occurring in the 55-year old athlete during such unusual endurance feat and, in part, to determine how it was that such an older individual could complete a physical event beyond the capacities of most younger men. LaTulippe ran the course in 20 hours at an average speed of 8.16 km/h with an estimated energy output of 59.1% of his maximum oxygen intake. His heart rate was monitored by telemetry and the average rate for the final four hours (125 beats/min) was not increased relative to speed and oxygen consumption for this portion of the run.Calculations of fluid balance suggest that water needs were met by fluids ingested every twelve minutes after the first four hours of running, such fluids consisting of water, tea/syrup, beef broth, mushroom soup and ice cream/syrup in rotation. TRUNCATED
Report Number
TR-77-X-33 —
Date of publication
15 Jul 1977
Number of Pages
23
DSTKIM No
78-00209
CANDIS No
80946
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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