TEMPERATURE STRESS AND IMMUNITY IN MICE

Authors
  1. Sabiston, B.H.
  2. Ste Rose, J.E.M.
  3. Cinader, B.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
When warm-blooded animals are exposed to a cold environment, their body temperature is preserved as a result of biochemical and physiological mechanisms which reduce heat losses and compensate for them. These mechanisms, including changes in hormone levels and in metabolic rate, can affect components of the immune apparatus (Trapani & Campbell, 1959; Ste Rose & Sabiston, 1971; Sabiston & Ste Rose, 1976; Ste Rose et al., 1976). The magnitude of these effects on the immune response may depend on the extent of thermal stress which, in turn, is a function of the amount of effective insulation and of the ratio between the body's surface area and volume. The final outcome of the response to stress may be modified by various genetic factors. It was the aim of the work to explore the different levels of genetic control involved in the response to cold stress.
Report Number
PUB-77-X-25 —
Date of publication
01 Jan 1977
Number of Pages
16
Reprinted from
J of Immunogenetics, vol 5, 1978, p 197-212
DSTKIM No
79-00567
CANDIS No
84925
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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