SCOTT EMERGENCY ESCAPE BREATHING DEVICE; EVALUATION FOR USE BY AIRCRAFT CABIN CREW AND PASSENGERS

Authors
  1. Martin, N.A.
  2. Popplow, J.R.
Corporate Authors
Defence and Civil Inst of Environmental Medicine, Downsview ONT (CAN)
Abstract
The Scott Emergency Escape Breathing Device (EEBD) was evaluated for use in Canadian Forces (CF) Transport/Passenger aircraft in providing smoke protection during emergency situations and in the prevention of hypoxia in the event of a cabin decompression at high altitude. Five human subjects wearing the EEBD were subjected to decompression from 2,438 meters (8,000 feet) to 9,753 meters (32,000 feet) in approximately 15 seconds followed by a free fall to 7,010 meters (23,000 feet) in a challenge gas atmosphere of 5,000 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO) where they performed moderate exercise (80 watts output) on a bicycle ergometer. Very little in-leakage of CO was observed when the neck seal was maintained. Hood atmosphere was measured at 97% oxygen at 7,010 meters which resulted in an arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) of 97%. Temperature in the hood rose to as high as 45.5 degrees Celsius but the subjects were able to function normally.
Report Number
DCIEM-86-P-34 — Research Paper
Date of publication
01 Jan 1985
Number of Pages
12
DSTKIM No
86-04562
CANDIS No
95434
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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