INTERACTION OF CULTURED MAMMALIAN CELLS WITH WR-2721 AND ITS THIOL, WR-1065: IMPLICATIONS FOR MECHANISMS OF RADIOPROTECTION

Authors
  1. Purdie, J.W.
  2. Inhaber, E.R.
  3. Schneider, H.
  4. Labelle, J.H.
Corporate Authors
Defence Research Establishment Ottawa, Ottawa ONT (CAN);National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa ONT (CAN)
Abstract
An isothermal microcalorimeter was used to measure changes in heat flow when radioprotective drugs were added to cultured mammalian cells. Rapid consumption of oxygen by radioprotected thiols indicates that they will not co-exist with oxygen for long in cells. This has two important implications with respect to mechanisms of radioprotection: (1) oxygen in tissues will be consumed rapidly and could result in local hypoxia; and, (2) at modest doses of protective agents the thiol will be consumed in oxic cells and hence very little will be available for reactions such as hydrogen donation. Results indicate that anoxia is probably the principal mechanism of protection by aminothiols in mammals and aerated cels. Major implications for clinical applications of radioprotectors are discussed.
Report Number
NRCC-21097 —
Date of publication
01 Jan 1983
Number of Pages
11
Reprinted from
Reprinted from Int J Radiat Biol, vol 43, no 5, 1983, p 517-527
DSTKIM No
86-03017
CANDIS No
97714
Format(s):
Hardcopy;Originator's fiche received by DSIS

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